WOW

Word to your mother.

July 23, 2014 at 4:43pm
3,656 notes
Reblogged from fohk

fohk:

I just don’t know what I’m supposed to be”

Lost in Translation (2003)
Sofia Coppola

(via girlswillbeboys)

4:37pm
368 notes
Reblogged from fuckyeahhistorycrushes
fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Charles “Lucky” Luciano (1897-1962) infamous gangster considered the “father of mordern organized crime in the US” (or so says Wikipedia). Born in Sicily, Luciano moved to the US and began his rise during Prohibition. He later became one of the most powerful men in the mob.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Charles “Lucky” Luciano (1897-1962) infamous gangster considered the “father of mordern organized crime in the US” (or so says Wikipedia).
Born in Sicily, Luciano moved to the US and began his rise during Prohibition. He later became one of the most powerful men in the mob.

4:36pm
117,146 notes
Reblogged from il---cervo---piccolo

(Source: il---cervo---piccolo, via cryingwhilegrinding)

4:19pm
5,210 notes
Reblogged from dropsofparadise

(Source: dropsofparadise, via thetingeofnotknowing)

4:01pm
2,330 notes
Reblogged from inthetwilightzone
pbsamericanmasters:

Truth. 

pbsamericanmasters:

Truth. 

(Source: inthetwilightzone)

3:54pm
54,579 notes
Reblogged from heteroh

heteroh:

"your lips look so chapped"

image

(via undertheraincloud)

9:32am
23,332 notes
Reblogged from tsathogguafitforbattle

(Source: tsathogguafitforbattle, via alienobs-erver)

9:28am
29,370 notes
Reblogged from annerbananerox

(Source: annerbananerox, via ryden420)

9:25am
19,939 notes
Reblogged from furything
furything:

beetles

furything:

beetles

(via ryden420)

1:33am
64 notes
Reblogged from calodaemon

I want to do with you what spring does with the cherry trees.

— Pablo Neruda, Twenty Love Poems and A Song of Despair (via calodaemon)

July 22, 2014 at 8:36pm
10 notes
Reblogged from antipurity

antipurity:

Guys, this cover is my fucking jam. Smoke some weed (or don’t), turn off all of the lights, and lie down on your floor and just do you. I don’t even know. Music.

8:30pm
53 notes
Reblogged from gay8

Look at all those chickens

(Source: gay8, via antipurity)

8:24pm
123,954 notes
Reblogged from eugenialoli

(Source: eugenialoli, via santacruzdreams)

8:22pm
429,272 notes
Reblogged from ginchface

(Source: ginchface, via antipurity)

7:26pm
13,850 notes
Reblogged from skunkbear

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

(via npr)